Survivors: Michelle Markel on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s Author

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

Michelle Markel is a successful children’s author with a long, distinguished career.

Reflecting on your personal journey, what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success?

Let’s cut to the chase. There was a major turning point in my career—when I nearly quit writing for children.

A little background: My first book,

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New Voices: Beth Anderson & Tina Cho on Bringing True Stories to the Page

By Traci Sorell

Picture book authors Beth Anderson and Tina Cho‘s debut books both explore actual events and both authors agree, craft study and critique groups are vital components on the path to publication.

Beth Anderson

Beth Anderson and I share a love of nonfiction. Her debut picture book, An Inconvenient Alphabet: Ben Franklin &

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Guest Post: Erin E. Moulton on an Anthology Proposal Crash Course

By Erin E. Moulton

In 2015, I had an idea for an anthology. It would be a collection written by sexual violence survivors for teen readers.

It would be part documentary, part creative content, part informational resource. That anthology was published in March 2018 and was called Things We Haven’t Said: Sexual Violence Survivors Speak Out (Zest Books, 2018).

It came out strong,

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Survivors: Leda Schubert on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s Author

 

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

Leda Schubert is a successful children’s author with a long, distinguished career.

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success? 

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Co-Creators Miranda Paul & Baptiste Paul on Picture Book Collaboration

By Traci Sorell

Spring is in the air. Time for planting seeds and stories. Today’s spotlight is on a new picture book author duo, Miranda and Baptiste Paul. While separately they’ve published picture books, their first co-creations were recently published.

This month they’ll begin a U.S. book tour with Tantoh Nforba Dieudonne, the subject of their newest picture book,

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Guest Post: J. Albert Mann on Choosing Fiction Over Nonfiction to Write Margaret Sanger’s Life

By J. Albert Mann

The Choice Between Fiction or Nonfiction

Choosing is what writers do. We choose our subjects, our characters, our point of views. If you write fiction, you are literally responsible for every horrible event which befalls your characters because they’re all your choices.

But there are choices in nonfiction, too—an entire universe of choices…even other universes. One of these choices in writing nonfiction is to crossover into fiction.

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Survivors: Kelly Milner Halls on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s-YA Author

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success? 

When I studied journalism in high school (California) and college (Utah), I thought I’d be an investigative reporter for a newspaper someday.

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Survivors: M.T. Anderson on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s-YA Author

Learn more about M.T. Anderson.

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed
to defy the odds to achieve continued success? (Mention the year your first book was published.)

My first book – Thirsty,

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Survivors: Melissa Stewart on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s Author

Learn more about Melissa Stewart.

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success? 

A piece of paper on the idea board above my desk says:

“Don’t be afraid to reinvent yourself.”

Those six simple words are a constant reminder of a lesson I learned the hard way at the beginning of my writing career.

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In Memory: Russell Freedman

By Gayleen Rabakukk

Russell Freedman, 88, Writer of History for Young Readers, Dies by Neil Genzlinger from The New York Times. Peek:

Russell Freedman, who brought readable, relatable history to young readers in dozens of well-researched, generously illustrated books, died on March 16 in Manhattan.”

“The prolific nonfiction author — winner of the 1988 Newbery Medal for Lincoln: A Photobiography (Clarion,

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