Guest Post: Mary Quattlebaum on Nonfiction, Connections & Environmental Change

By Mary Quattlebaum

At a recent book event, a little boy was nonplussed to discover that humans are animals, too.

“You mean, me?” he asked incredulously. “I’m an animal?”

Yup, welcome to the family!

I loved doing the research for Brother, Sister, Me and You (National Geographic, 2019), especially since this nonfiction picture book was inspired by my own tumble-bumble pack of three sisters and three brothers.

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Guest Post: Lisa Papademetriou on Writing Tools

By Lisa Papademetriou

What are we to make of the knowledge that we share DNA with a banana?

No, I’m not kidding. All life on earth evolved from a single-celled common ancestor—our genes and banana genes are over 60 percent identical.

I love thinking about this because stories are the same. The cellular structure that underlies the vast majority of fiction is descended from an ancient ancestor,

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Intern Insights: Strategies for Achieving Your Creative Goals

By Gayleen Rabakukk

Lately I’ve been giving a lot of thought to time, in part because time travel factors into my manuscript, but also because scheduling is one of my biggest challenges.

Family life, teaching gigs and volunteer work quickly fill my days—not to mention the household chores I should be doing (my home could easily be mistaken for a dust bunny rescue). With all those tasks competing for my time,

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New Voices: Authors Jenn Bailey & Breanna McDaniel on Writing Highly Personal Stories for Children

By Stephani Martinell Eaton

It is with much joy that I introduce Jenn Bailey and Breanna McDaniel, two debut picture book authors who share their struggles and triumphs of bringing their highly personal stories to the page.

Jenn Bailey

What were the challenges in bringing the text to life?

I should probably start by explaining that A Friend for Henry (illustrated by Mika Song (Chronicle,

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Guest Post: Amy Rose Capetta & Cori McCarthy Share Craft & Career Insights

By Cori McCarthy & Amy Rose Capetta

Hello dear readers (and, in many cases, writers)!

Amy Rose and I are here today to interview each other in celebration and—let’s be honest—promotion of our debut coauthored YA novel Once & Future (Jimmy Patterson, 2019), a genderbent King Arthur retelling in space, which is out now from Little, Brown.

We’re blessed to be doing a lot of interviews this release season,

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Survivors: Liz Garton Scanlon on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s Author

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

Liz Garton Scanlon is a successful children’s author with a long, distinguished career.

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success? 

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Guest Post: Erin E. Moulton on an Anthology Proposal Crash Course

By Erin E. Moulton

In 2015, I had an idea for an anthology. It would be a collection written by sexual violence survivors for teen readers.

It would be part documentary, part creative content, part informational resource. That anthology was published in March 2018 and was called Things We Haven’t Said: Sexual Violence Survivors Speak Out (Zest Books, 2018).

It came out strong,

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Survivors: Leda Schubert on Thriving as a Long-Time, Actively Publishing Children’s Author

 

By Cynthia Leitich Smith

Leda Schubert is a successful children’s author with a long, distinguished career.

In children’s-YA writing, maintaining an active publishing career is arguably an even bigger challenge than breaking into the field.

Reflecting on your personal journey (creatively, career-wise, and your writer’s heart), what bumps did you encounter and how have you managed to defy the odds to achieve continued success? 

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Guest Post: J. Albert Mann on Choosing Fiction Over Nonfiction to Write Margaret Sanger’s Life

By J. Albert Mann

The Choice Between Fiction or Nonfiction

Choosing is what writers do. We choose our subjects, our characters, our point of views. If you write fiction, you are literally responsible for every horrible event which befalls your characters because they’re all your choices.

But there are choices in nonfiction, too—an entire universe of choices…even other universes. One of these choices in writing nonfiction is to crossover into fiction.

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Agent-Author Interview: Jacqueline Lipton – New Agent at Storm Literary Agency & Author of an Upcoming Legal Handbook for Writers

By Robin Galbraith

I’m excited to share Jacqueline Lipton‘s journey from lawyer to children’s writer to lliterary agent.

How and why did you become an agent?

I’ve been interested in agenting for a long time, after someone suggested it to me many years ago as a way to merge my interests in law and business with my interests in writing and publishing.

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