Bookseller Interview: Nicoletta “Nico” Maldini of Libreria Trame Bookstore in Bologna, Italy.

By Angela Cerrito
for SCBWI Bologna 2018 and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Note: This interview is part of a series focusing on the Bologna Children’s Book Fair


SCBWI Assistant International Adviser Angela Cerrito talks with Nicoletta “Nico” Maldini, a partner in the Libreria Trame Bookstore in the heart of Bologna, Italy. 

Tell us about Liberia Trame, what inspired you to open the bookstore?

I started working in a bookstore since 1990, after my second degree in liberal arts and many years in my father’s menswear store.

After working at three different companies, I decided to start a new business, together with two friends. I opened Trame in December 2005; it’s an independent bookstore with a selection of books for children and adults, open Mondays to Saturdays, and all December Sundays.



The SCBWI community recognizes Liberia Trame for the SCBWI dance parties during the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. What other events do you offer at the store?

We love our common SCBWI Biennial Dance party, but you are correct we have much more going on at Trame’s.
In 2017, we had 120 events in the store, mostly book signing with authors, and conferences about new books, novels, poetry or essays, and sometimes classics.

We also hosted seven exhibitions, photographs, or illustrations.
We have a resident reading group and collaborate with three more. Also, we collaborate with cultural associations and Bologna University. Last year, we supported with books or press conferences more than 80 events out of the store.

One of the many successes of Libreria Trame is the sense of community. Your newsletter promotes events bringing together people from literature, drama, all areas of the arts and politics. How have you managed to attract such a diverse group of patrons to the store?

I’ve always liked the opportunity to offer different occasions of encounters. I’ve been working for a public radio for more than 20 years, and I’ve just started, with a bunch of friends, a new web radio called Neu Radio. Books offer so many ideas and people like to join together for a good conversation and a glass of wine.

What advice do you have for anyone considering opening a bookstore in their home town?

Maybe I would suggest first to check if it’s possible to cooperate with an existing one, it being not an easy moment to start a new business. And to study deeply the location and the relation with the scholastic community, starting from children and families as these customers could guarantee a better life for the store.

Nico has always loved books

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I like cinema and music, classical jazz and rock. And, of course, I’m an early reader; I started at three and never stopped.

I’m a good eater, which being Italian is quite common, too.

Cynsational Notes

Nico Maldini is a partner in the Libreria Trame Bookstore, located at Via Goito 3/c, a side street of the Via Indipendenza.

Born in Bologna, she is a traveler and a book lover.

Angela Cerrito is an author and playwright.

Her latest novel, The Safest Lie (Holiday House, 2015) was named a Notable Social Studies Book for Young People by the National Council for the Social Studies, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book from the Association of Jewish Libraries, and received SCBWI’s Crystal Kite Award.

She serves as the Assistant International Advisor for SCBWI and a co-organizer of SCBWI at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. She also is the Cynsations reporter for Europe.

This interview is part of the SCBWI Bologna Interview series coordinated by Elisabeth Norton, SCBWI Regional Advisor for Switzerland.

2017 Eurpolitan Con Portfolio Winner: Simona M. Ceccarelli

By Angela Cerrito

for Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Note: Cynsations reporter Angela Cerrito interviewed Simona M. Ceccarelli, winner of the portfolio contest that took place at the SCBWI Europolitan Con in Belgium earlier this year. This is the first of two articles.

Simona M. Ceccarelli is a freshly hatched children’s writer and illustrator. A passion for visual storytelling and the success of her early whiteboard animation series “Drawn to Science” has actually drawn her out of a career in science to focus on creating worlds for children – with pen and pencil, keyboard and stylus.

Simona is represented by Andrea Cascardi of the Transatlantic Literary Agency. Instagram: simona.ceccarelli Twitter: @smceccarelli

Simona, Congratulation on winning the Portfolio Showcase Competition at SCBWI’s Europolitan Conference


What made you decide to enter your portfolio?


SCBWI conferences are great. You meet adults who don’t think it’s weird to talk about children’s books for hours. You can quote Dr. Seuss or Shel Silverstein and everybody gets it. The chance to show your work to such people – be it writers, other illustrators or industry professionals – and get their opinion is too good to pass up.

Fight and Flight – one of the illustrations Simona submitted at the Europolitan Showcase

How did you decide which illustrations to include in your portfolio for the competition?

Selecting images for a portfolio is a tough call, and, when it comes back from the printer, there is always some illustrations you wish you had included and some you would like to take out.

Luckily, you can also bring postcards – and ultimately, all your work represents you in one way or another. I picked the pieces I like most, trying to show a range of different subjects – children, animals, fantasy creatures – full scenes with background as well as vignettes and character design.

And of course a set of illustrations that show character consistency, which is very important in children’s book illustration.

Lucy’s Problem – one of Simona’s portfolio submissions for the Europolitan Showcase

Most of all, how did it feel when your name was announced by the judges Laurent Linn of Simon & Schuster (also an SCBWI Board Member) and Stephanie Amster of Bloomsbury UK

I had this sudden sense of having hopped thorough a magic portal into an alternate reality.

I often have that feeling when something good and unexpected happens to me: it must have happened to a different person…an alternate me. For a while, every time the self-doubt monster attacks (I should do a graphic short-story about that!), I can whack it on the head with this award and send it cowering to a corner.

Simona at her digital workstation. Photo by Idit Kobrini

I’m so curious about your use of Zbrush in your illustrations. The company, Pixologic, describes Zbrush as a tool for 3D painting and sculpting. What drew you to Zbrush?

I studied Visual Development for animation, where many of my teachers insisted that “the ability to visualize in 3D” is one of the most important skills an artist should have. My thesis advisor, Nicolas Villareal, wrote that in every single review: I struggled with turning characters in my head.

Photo by Idit Kobrini

ZBrush was just being introduced in the curriculum of Vis Dev artists, and I thought I would give it a try. I fell in love with it heart over heels (admittedly, I have a sweet spot for graphic software in general).

It has been a huge help in my ability to think dimensionally and for a while I experimented with introducing it into the illustration workflow. I don’t do hybrid illustrations anymore, but I still use it for character maquettes, as well as another 3D software, SketchUp, for environment models.

I love your illustrations from the 100Kids challenge. Have you done other 100 illustration challenges? Why did you decide to create 100 different, fully rendered, child characters?

When I decided to knock on the door of children’s illustration I was emerging from a two-year project designing goblins. My portfolio was full of them: good goblins, evil goblins, old and young, male and females. It didn’t take a lot of insight to realize that it was a little one-sided.

I knew that the number one thing a children’s illustration portfolio must include is children. At about the same time, I saw a video by Jake Parker talking about “design-100-thing challenges” and then the idea took flight. I decided to do full illustrations or vignettes rather than just sketches because I needed to beef up my portfolio and explore illustration styles.

Now, after nearly 70 kids, I am focusing more on stylization, so I sometimes post black and white work.

I had never done 100 illustration challenges before, but I am pretty sure I will start another one when this one is over. It´s a great experience, very impactful on many levels – and it got my social media channels rolling as well.

100 Kids – number 35

You’ve studied in Italy, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. 


How has living and learning in multiple languages and cultures influenced your work?

They say “fish are the last to see water.”

I think it is the same here. When you experience a multicultural environment for a long time (actually from birth – my family is British-Italian), it’s part of you, as much as your handwriting and your gait – you don’t really notice it.

Laurent and Stephanie have paid me a wonderful compliment saying that my work appeals equally to European and American sensibility. If that is true, then maybe that is the biggest impact that living and working in different cultures has had on my work.

It’s especially nice since I was sometimes told (alternatively and by different people) that my work is either too “American” or too “European.”

At least now I can answer with some authority: “it’s both!”

My personal “Hall of fame” – the illustrators I look up to as my inspiration – live in all corners of the world.

I believe there is a common core in narrative illustration that transcends all cultural borders – storytelling is universal.

I’m drawn to The Pirates of Oz, please share more about this alternate version of The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (1900).

The illustration was done for an art challenge to design an alternate Wizard of Oz world. I came up with Dorothy as a pirate captain whose ship crash-lands in Oz during a storm. She hears about the fabulous treasure of the Wizard and sets out to loot it, collecting a motley crew of characters along the way – each declaring a pirate-y interest in gold, but in reality pursuing a private wish.

I never wrote the story but there is a couple of unfinished illustrations strewn around this idea. It has found a temporary home in “The Bin” – the notebook in which I confine all half-baked ideas.

Your short-story graphic novel, Inkling, is posted on your blog and you describe the project in terms of an exercise in form – inking, panels and storyboarding. 


I’m very drawn to the story itself, a fascinating look at an artist literally creating his own reality with his art. What inspired this character and his experiences?

That is a truly personal story – it has many meanings for me. Narrative artists create a world with art – even if only for the space of a film, a book, a graphic novel or even a single vignette illustration.

It is a magic and mystical act, one that should be met with wonder and humility and a bit of fear – both as a viewer and as a creator. And which artist has not fallen in love with one of his characters at some point?

Also, more pragmatically, I love graphic novels and I want to create some for children. “Inkling” was much needed hands-on training, after many online courses and books. Maybe it will take more experiments before I tackle bigger projects in this space, but it certainly is a lot of fun!

You made a dramatic career change – from research scientist to illustrator. How do you reconcile these two wildly different careers and what influence does one have on the other?

I definitely do not regret having gone into science first – it’s been a blast, and I would not be who I am without that section of my life. I have been through frazzled times, where I was leading two disconnected lives (for years I was working in a research lab during the day and struggling on my art school assignments at night).

Needless to say, many people (including me) have been puzzled by the decision to quit science for illustration and the impostor syndrome has been savagely rampant at times.

Now I sit on a boxful of ideas on how to combine science and storytelling and narrative illustration in new ways, and I am sure the two careers will end up joining forces and producing some interesting offspring.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I am afraid my habits are extremely unhealthy. I am addicted to books, audiobooks and animation films (at least I got clean of internet wormholes and managed to stay clean so far).

When I work, I live out of coffee and butter-spaghetti. I sleep too little and sit too much. I never learned to ski, skate or play team sports (I should get a token for every time I heard: “What? You live in Switzerland and cannot ski?”)

I’d rather stay indoors if the temperature is above 30 or below 10 Celsius (that’s 86 and 50 Fahrenheit) and my idea of fun is spending an afternoon sketching at a museum. Luckily, I am surrounded by wonderful people who take me as I am and yet coax me out of my comfort zone, so that I can get inspiration and stay healthy.

Simona at her analog workstation

My family is the center of my life. So much so, that my studio is actually a family room – the potential distraction is a fair price for the energy and inspiration I get from being around my husband and children. My kids feed me countless ideas and make it worthwhile to go biking, hiking and horse-riding (and cook dinners.…occasionally).

I have friends who don’t think it boring to talk about books for half the night and have the privilege to work part-time in a creative team with great colleagues and designers, whom I constantly learn from. And of course there are all the magnificent people I have met on the web – a particular shoutout to the fellow author-illustrators I met virtually on the SVS forum and on social media.

I collect quotes from all sources and shamelessly sprinkle them in every conversation. So I cannot let this interview be finished without including one! This is by film director Werner Herzog:

“Ideas are like uninvited guests. They don’t knock on the door; they climb in through the windows like burglars who show up in the middle of the night and make a racket in the kitchen as they raid the fridge.”

Creativity for me has very much to do with getting to know the loud intruders in front of coffee and spaghetti and turn them into friends. It takes a lot of time and energy but it’s totally worth the effort.

Cynsational Notes

Cynsations reporter Angela Cerrito is a writer, pediatric physical therapist and SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor.

Her recent novel, The Safest Lie (Holiday House), was named a Best Book of the Year by The Guardian, a Notable Social Studies Book for Young People by the Children’s Book Council and the National Council for Social Studies, and was awarded SCBWI’s Crystal Kite.

Her plays have been produced in the EU and USA. When she’s not working or writing, you may find her hanging out with her family, trying new (vegan) recipes, or volunteering at the community theatre.

2017 SCBWI Europolitan Con: Authors Angela Cerrito & Susanne Gervay

By Tioka Tokedira

for Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Note: Angela and Susanne were interviewed by SCBWI France Regional Advisor Tioka Tokedira about the upcoming Europolitan Conference. This is the fourth in a series of six articles.


Angela Cerrito

Angela Cerrito is an author and a playwright whose work explores issues of identity and cultural perceptions. Her latest novel, The Safest Lie (Holiday House, 2015), was named a Best Children’s Book of the Year by The Guardian, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book and a Notable Social Studies Book for Young People.

Prior to publication, The Safest Lie was awarded the Kimberly Colen Memorial Grant from SCBWI which supported interviews and historical research in Warsaw Poland. She volunteers as the Assistant International Advisor for SCBWI.

In addition to writing, Angela is always eager to speak to students about writing, research and the child rescues from the Warsaw ghetto.

Awarded an Order of Australia, Susanne Gervay is recognized for her writing on social justice. An award winning short story writer, she is widely published in literary journals and anthologies including the Indian-Australian, Fear Factor, Terror Incognito (PanMacmillan, 2009) alongside Sir Salman Rushdie and Thomas Keneally.

Susanne Gervay

Her books are translated into many languages and include her young adult Butterflies (Kane/Miller Book Publishers, 2011) recognized as Outstanding Youth Literature on Disability and rite-of-passage anti-bullying I Am Jack books (Kane/Miller Book Publishers) which have been adapted into a play touring Australia and the United States.

Susanne’s picture books address disability, inclusion, multiculturalism, while Elephants Have Wings (illustrated by Anna Pignataro, Ford Street Publishing, 2014) engages with peace, in development as an animation.

Susanne’s books are endorsed by Room to Read, Cancer Council, Alannah & Madeline Foundation, Variety, Children’s Hospital Westmead, Life Education and many organizations.

An acclaimed international speaker, Susanne is Regional Advisor SCBWI Australia East & New Zealand, Writer Ambassador for Room to Read and Books in Home, patron Monkey Baa Theatre, former Chair of NSW Writers Centre, Australia Day Ambassador.



Susanne, can you describe your dream partnership?

Susanne: My dream partnership is a mature, professional relationship with my publisher. Ideally it is a relationship where we work together not only on the crafting of the novel, but the promotions and marketing.

Barriers to that relationship at the beginning of your career, are the imbalance. The publisher holds the power over your manuscript, from acceptance of the work, editorial direction, delivery, marketing and sales. As a consequence, it made me voiceless and the relationship was one sided.

There was also a disconnection in the process of what you can do. Will the publisher approve? Will they work with you? You also do not understand the drivers in the publishing house. The Publishing house may decide to cut their list, or increase their list. They may decide to submit you to festivals to speak or not. They may decide to promote your book or not. It is like working in the dark and falling into holes that are a mighty struggle to climb out of.

So why do you value this relationship?

When I began working with my publisher, I knew nothing. With my first book, I was unimportant in the scale of author status. I did not realise that authors were allocated positions of priority depending on brand, potential sales and awards.

My relationship changed over the years, with new books being accepted, higher profile and putting in a great deal of work in supporting my books. My publisher became my voice in the publishing house, participating in the development of story ideas, and the direction of my career.

Angela: A dream partnership for me is finding someone who will push me to make my writing better. It has changed, if I’m honest (and what’s the point if we’re not honest, right?)

Early on I was seeking praise. I joined critique groups and sent my work off to critique partners over the internet simply seeking positive feedback. I wanted someone –anyone- to say, “You can write!” or “This is great!” or “I want to read more of your work.”

The way this has changed for me is when I received a professional critique at an SCBWI conference and I realized that the editor didn’t understand my story. At a very basic level she didn’t get it. And it was my fault. My POV was weak and the writing was really weak.

Responsibility hit me like a ton of bricks. Because, if a reader can’t understand my story, there is only one person responsible in that equation. It was a powerful lesson for me. It is my responsibility to write in such a way that the reader, any reader, will understand.

What is the most surprising thing that you’ve learned from one of your partners?

Angela: This was really interesting for me. I remember hearing Susan Jeffers talk at an SCBWI conference. She said that one of her best mentors actually got into her art.

Got into it as in he said, “Not that way. Do it like this…” Then he dipped a brush in paint and swished it around her canvas, changing it. This surprised me to no end –that a mentor would do such a thing and that she said it was what she needed and it made all the difference. (Aside: I’m not an artist, but I can only imagine.)

Well, I had a similar and very valuable surprise at yet another SCBWI critique session. This time it was with Stephen Roxborough. He showed me the pages and said simply. “Don’t do this. Don’t write like this.” And struck a line through many, many, many, many of my words in that sample.

I know myself and I tend to overwrite. So the strikethrough wasn’t such a surprise, but his word choices were. This was an individualized lesson in tightening prose. Reading it again –anew—without the extra words was very powerful for me. It’s a lesson I try to re-live every time I revise.

Susanne: The most surprising thing I have learnt is that even the most successful creator, is torn by doubts. The support of partners and community becomes more important than publication at times.

Can you tell us about one of those moments of doubt?

Susanne: I always thought writing would become easier, but it doesn’t. I finish a chapter and think that I can’t write another one. But in the end, I do.

I am writing a new children’s novel called ‘Louie at the Hughie’ at this moment. I have written 20,000 words and have stopped. There is another 10,000 words that I must write to complete the journey, but I am torn by doubt. The novel is so important to me, as it is set in The Hughenden Hotel, my Sydney family hotel and Centennial Parklands across the road. My children grew up in the hotel and for 25 years it has been integral to my life.

The hotel has just been sold and as I go through the seven stages of grief, I have been unable to write. I am now reaching acceptance and I will write again. Regain my belief in my work. Life always melds with writing. At times, it inspires me to race ahead. At other times, it makes me reflect. At other times, it makes me doubt that I can write.

What kind of partner are you to other writers, and why?

Angela: This question has really brought to light how many people I am a partner to with my writing. For books this includes my agent, my editor and publisher as well as readers.

For plays this extends to the directors, actors and production crew who dedicate so much time and talent to bring a play to the stage, as well as the audience. I feel the best partner I can be as a writer is honest and responsive. I’m always learning.

I’m also a partner in SCBWI, of course. As the Assistant International Advisor, I hope to be a valuable resource to SCBWI members worldwide. For years the focus was bringing awareness about international chapters, publishers, awards and opportunities to members of the U.S. and answering questions from members outside the U.S. about the US market.

Now this is more of a two-way conversation thanks SCBWI’s new initiatives such as translators (Avery Udagawa SCBWI’s Translator Coordinator), Spanish Language efforts expanding from the Spain and Mexico chapters to the U.S. (LaCometa SCBWI’s Spanish Language Bulletin put out by Judy Goldman, RA Mexico and Melana Alzu, SCBWI’s Spanish Language Coordinator) and members all over the world eager to participate in the Bologna Illustrator’s Gallery and SCBWI Bologna’s Digital Catalogue.

Susanne: As a partner in SCBWI, I am committed to the children’s book community. It is integral to my creative life and is one of the important strands in my days. I support many authors and illustrators and help them in their careers. It has brought me great pleasure to see new writers and illustrators reach publication and more.

Susanne with editor
of student paper in Istanbul

As a partner with the publishing industry in Australia, I support initiatives such as Public and Educational Lending Rights where authors are paid each year by the government for books in libraries. I meet industry bodies such as the Australian Society of Authors to gain benefits for SCBWI members. I work with publishers to shares their knowledge with the SCBWI community here.

It has connected me with extraordinary creators and the publishing industry and I love it.

As a partner with my publisher(s), it is about friendship, sharing of knowledge, development of my own creative work. I meet for dinner, coffee, socially and professionally.


How has SCBWI been a valued partner to you?

Angela: How much time do you have?

SCBWI has been my education in writing for children, in writing really. I’m very fortunate to have found SCBWI early on when I was searching for writing opportunities and learning the market.

Susanne: SCBWI is extraordinary. As a novice writer, I was three years in the wilderness. I had no idea about how to enter this career. It was painful and filled with rejection and dead ends.

Angela: It’s pretty amazing how much you learn from SCBWI. When you start reading the Bulletin, going to conferences and meeting mentors. They key is that they combine craft based education with professional information and submission opportunities. There’s so much to learn!

Susanne: SCBWI is truly the light. It gives information, friendship, support, guidance and more. It is like a safe place to enter the changeable world of publication. I love my SCBWI community and the talented, funny, amazing authors and illustrators who partner me in my creative life.



Susanne and Angela, thank you for sharing your thoughts on partnerships with us today.

Tioka Tokedira has been the SCBWI France Regional Advisor since 2007 and was one of the organizers for the first Europolitan Conference.

Tioka loves helping others tell their stories. She’s worked as a teacher, writing festival coordinator, literacy consultant for international governments, and documentary television producer.

She currently reviews books for Hachette Livre.

2017 SCBWI Europolitan Con Interview: Dina von Lowenkraft & Elisabeth Norton of Team Europolitan

By Angela Cerrito

Note: SCBWI Regional Advisors Dina von Lowenkraft and Elisabeth Norton were interviewed by Angela Cerrito about the upcoming SCBWI Europolitan Conference. This is the first in a series of six articles.

Angela: May 2017 will be the third time the Europolitan is being held, what do you think makes it unique?


Elisabeth: There are several ways in which I think the Europolitan is unique.

First, there’s its size. With approximately 65 attendees (including the volunteers working behind the scenes to make the conference happen), the faculty: attendee ratio is the smallest of any conference I’ve attended. This results in smaller groups in the breakout sessions, more chances to get to know other attendees and even chat with faculty members on breaks or at socials.

Secondly, we realize that we have a diverse membership whose publication goals may vary, so we have faculty from more than one publication market. This year we have publishing industry professionals from both the U.S. and U.K. markets. And one of our PAL faculty members is coming all the way from Australia!

Another thing I love about the Europolitan and that I think is unique to this conference is the number
of opportunities for attendees to get to know each other, not just at the conference, but through optional pre- and post-conference activities like the Scrawl Crawl, pre-conference dinner, and post-conference critique meeting. Many friendships and critique partnerships have been formed as a result of past Europolitan conferences!

Paris Scrawl Crawl, photo by Kirsten Carlson

Dina: There are so many ways in which the Europolitan is unique! 

As Elisabeth pointed out, we have a diverse membership with unique needs. Many of our members are ex-pats, living in countries where the language they write in (English) isn’t the language of the country they live in. 
Other members are writing in English as a second (or third) language. And for our illustrators and author/illustrators the type of illustrations that are being published in the country they live in may or may not correspond to the market they are/would like to publish in. Because of this, we feel it is essential to offer our members insight into both the U.K. and the U.S. markets – markets that are different from the ones where our members live.

Given the diverse nature of our regions, where many of our members can’t easily come together for a critique group or social event, the Europolitan offers a unique opportunity to network and create friendships with fellow creatives. 

In order to encourage this, we have from the very first Europolitan in Paris in 2013, held pre- and post- conference events that are free and open to all attendees who can come. The resulting camaraderie amongst attendees who participated in the pre-conference Scrawl Crawl and group dinner, right from the start of the conference on Saturday, was amazing – and exhilarating. Walking through the halls of the art school where the event was held, you saw familiar faces.

That random person sitting next to you at a breakout session wasn’t a stranger. And because of the many joyful greetings and relaxed atmosphere, even those who couldn’t attend the pre-conference events were quickly brought into the group. The energy was explosive!


And, as Elisabeth pointed out, the fact that our conference has such a high ratio of faculty to attendees (this year we expect approximately a 1:5 ratio, excluding volunteers), means everyone gets a chance to know our faculty on a human level.

Europolitan Conference in Paris, photo by Tess Krűss

For me, this is one of the most important things people get from our Europolitan conference – an understanding of the people behind the often romanticized idea of ‘agent’ or ‘editor’ or ‘art director.’ As with any industry, each professional is unique – making their list, their way of interacting with clients, their view of what works or isn’t working their own. 

Understanding that, chatting with professionals about other topics than what they are working on, helps members to understand that working with a professional isn’t just a contract for a book, it’s a relationship. And a relationship around a creative piece is a long term investment.

The other thing that makes the Europolitan unique is its moving venue. 

Since there are 5 participating countries hosting it, we rotate through France, the Netherlands, Belgium+Luxembourg, Switzerland and Germany+Austria. We hope this means attending will be easy for all members at some point! Besides – it’s great fun to get to discover a new city or get to know another country better each time.

Angela: I agree with you 100 percent about the energy and sense of community. Tell us about the origins of the Europolitan Conference.

Dina: When I became Regional Advisor in 2012, three fellow Regional Advisors aka ‘RAs’ (Tioka Tokedira in France, Kirsten Carlson in Germany-Austria and Mina Witteman in the Netherlands) had just begun discussing ways of creating a larger event than any one of us could host on our own with the idea that such an event would be beneficial to all of our members. 

I remember the excitement of my first discussions with them at the Bologna Book Fair. Not long after this, Jay Whistler became RA for Switzerland and joined in the discussion. From Tioka, Kirsten and Mina’s original idea, the Europolitan with our 5 participating regions was born.

Just about a year later, the first Europolitan was held in France in April 2013 right after the Bologna Book Fair. The idea was to capitalize on potential U.S. faculty who would already be in Europe as well as to invite U.K. faculty. The first Europolitan was a resounding success.

Amsterdam Scrawl Crawl, photo by Monika Baum

Mina took up the challenge of creating the second Europolitan in the Netherlands two years later. As I mentioned previously, some of what I feel are the key elements of the Europolitan have been in place since the beginning: the desire to create a community across Europe and to give our small regions a special conference that will help members not only learn more about craft and the marketplace but will also promote long-term friendships and provide the opportunity to interact with industry professionals.

Our current team, with myself in Belgium+Luxembourg, Tioka Tokedira in France, Patti Buff in Germany+Austria, Melanie Rook Welfing in the Netherlands and Elisabeth Norton in Switzerland, continue to believe in these ideas and have worked hard to create the third edition of the Europolitan in Belgium. In fact, we’ve even taken the idea of collaboration one step further and now work together in-between conferences as well.


Angela: How do you collaborate across borders?

Elisabeth’s desk

Elisabeth: The host region has a lot to do related to the local aspects of hosting the conference – finding a suitable venue, figuring out meals, hotels, etc. 

The official planning committee consists of the Regional Advisors from the country that hosted the previous conference (in this case, The Netherlands), the host of the current conference (Belgium-Luxembourg), and the host of the next conference (Switzerland). That said, the reality is that the Regional Advisors from all five regions spend many hours working together via video conference and email to collaborate on every detail of the conference – from the website to the program schedule.

Dina: The original idea was to make the planning committee the trio Elisabeth mentioned. But I think each Europolitan reflects the host country and I prefer a broader, more inclusive approach. 

I’ve always included the other four RAs in all my discussions and they have each participated and helped in different ways. The conference is a team effort – or rather it is the result of the efforts of multiple teams. 
In addition to the planning team of RAs, there is the Local Team consisting of myself, the Belgian Illustrator Coordinator (I.C.), Gabriela Nicole Gonzalez and our U.K. coordinator, Catherine Coe. During the conference, there will also be the Volunteer Team consisting of the ICs and ARAs of our 5 regions. 
Chateau-du-Cheneau in Braine l’Alleud

Because of the nature of the venue (a manor house in Braine l’Alleud) I also have a duo of volunteers, SCBWI members Rose Deniz and Jeannine Johnson-Maia, to help me on site. In total, there are 14 people who have volunteered their time and collaborated to make this event happen. 

So even if the host country is the one to orchestrate the event, no Europolitan can come into existence without the help and support of all of the member regions.

One thing that has come out of our five-region collaboration is, not surprisingly, a desire to find other ways to offer our members even more. As I mentioned earlier, in between the conferences we continue to build on our team efforts. 

For example, we’ve requested and been granted an official page on the scbwi.org website. We’ve brainstormed about the needs of our members and the kinds of offerings we can give. 
We’ve maintained a WebEx platform to facilitate crit groups and to be able to offer webinars. And we even have a few exciting things in the works for our ‘off’ years in between conferences. But shhh… more about that to be announced at the Europolitan in May in Belgium!

Angela: How did your team arrive at this year’s theme: Pens, Pencils & Partnerships?


Dina: One of the things that has struck me from the beginning with SCBWI is the way people come together and share – be it on craft, on industry insights or on creating events to help others. 

Writing and/or illustrating are often solitary activities – but being part of SCBWI has shown me just how much more fulfilling it is when you can share that path with fellow creatives. I have also learned over the years that even if you do write your manuscript on your own, you don’t get it out to market on your own. 
Every step along the way includes various forms of partnerships, be it crit partners, an agent, an editor, a cover artist or a publicist… and the many ways you interact with others is part of what makes this industry so special. Because of that, and because of the collaborative nature of how the Europolitan is run, I felt that paying homage to this theme was a nice way of sharing with everyone one of the values I personally believe in: respect – because you can’t have a partnership without it. 
And although I didn’t plan it (the idea first came up in early 2016), I feel that the idea of working together, of respect and giving everyone the freedom to create according to their own vision, is timely.

Gemma and Natalie

One of the things we tried to do when looking for faculty was to find industry professionals and creatives who are currently working together. Some of our first faculty members were agent Gemma Cooper of The Bent Agency, and her client, author Robin Stevens. We were then lucky enough to be able to invite Natalie Doherty, commissioning editor at Penguin Random House Children’s, who published Robin’s books.

One funny, and very Europolitan anecdote, is that when I reached out to our previous faculty member Jill Santopolo, editorial director of Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers Group, she suggested I contact Kendra Levin, executive editor at Viking Children’s Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House – who it turns out has collaborated with Natalie Doherty on various projects between the U.K. and the U.S.

Jill Santopolo, photo by Alison May

And since the agent-client relationship is so important, we also decided to bring in an agent-illustrator
duo with Penny Holroyde, co-founder of Holroyde-Cartey, and author/illustrator Chris Mould.

These are just some of the many relationships we have threading through this year’s Europolitan and some of the facets we will explore in our panels on Working Together, whether it be in terms of relationships within the industry or in the terms of the actual process of how a book gets from idea to reader.

I’d also like to point out that even this interview is a fun expression of the many roles and relationships we all have because you, Angela, are also one of our faculty members and a fellow SCBWI volunteer.

Angela: Thank you, Dina, another obvious partnership is Cynsations. After attending and volunteering at many SCBWI international conferences, I’m honored to be part of the Europolitan faculty this year. The Europolitan certainly creates a community. It strikes me that the community begins to form even before the event and lasts long after. Can you speak to the webinars that are offered before the conference as well as the lasting connections from attending Europolitan?


Dina: Yes, it’s true – the community starts to come together well before the conference, even before the Scrawl Crawl!

Amsterdam Europolitan Conference, photo by Mina Witteman

The webinars are something we started for the second Europolitan in Amsterdam in 2015. It’s a nice way of kick-starting the conference, bringing the community together and getting to know the faculty. Our webinars are always small and they feel more like a workshop than an impersonal web lecture. Everyone has video – from faculty to the SCBWI host to the attending members – which means we can all see each other, making it feel more like being together. 

We always start the session half an hour early and encourage members to log on then so that we can check for any technical issues. We then chat and catch up before the faculty member joins us. I really appreciate having that extra time and chance to hear what everyone is working on, what good news they have to share or what craft issue they have been working through.

Faculty members have really enjoyed our smaller, more intimate format – and even if we are each on our own computer in a number of different countries, it always feels like we have shared a moment together. 

Members can ask questions themselves instead of typing in their question as one has to do with the larger webinars and we’ve often had some really interesting discussions. Running these webinars is something I really enjoy doing – not only does it allow us to get into the Europolitan feeling early, it also allows those who can’t attend the conference to still benefit from the fabulous line-up we have. 
We’ve also scheduled two webinars for after the conference, which we hope will help people keep up their motivation and the connections they made at the conference.

I love how we are able to create a community feeling across borders – and know it is so much nicer to show up at an event already knowing other people and having exchanged with them. It’s also why we are so happy to have the opportunity to do these interviews – it helps members get to know our faculty members and the people behind the making of the Europolitan.

Elisabeth hiking at Zermatt

Elisabeth: I think the sense of community starts to form as soon as people announce on social media that they have registered, and talk about how excited they are to be attending. This continues as people start talking about accommodations, looking for roommates and/or travel buddies. 

For example, through social media we’ve learned that (so far) there are five Swiss SCBWI members flying to Brussels on the same flight! Just knowing that we’ll be traveling together heightens our anticipation, and of course the conference, writing and illustrating will be our primary topics of conversation as we travel.

There are some people that only see each other in person at the Europolitan conferences, but between conferences, they keep in touch via email and social media. Personally I have critiqued for people that I’ve met at Europolitan, and it’s great to know that when I’m ready, they will critique my manuscript.

I love initiatives like the webinars. As Dina said, they enable people who are unable to attend the conference to participate in one aspect of the conference initiatives. And I’m excited about some of the other initiatives that we have up our sleeves! 

By combining the efforts of five smaller regions, we’ve managed to put some amazing opportunities out there that not only members of our own regions, but from the entire SCBWI and greater Kidlit community can benefit from.

Angela : SCBWI members come to Europolitan with various levels of experience (from newly starting out to multi-published), creating a wide variety of content (writers, illustrators, picture books, non-fiction, graphic novels, middle grade, young adult, interactive media and more) as well as being diverse in many other ways including language and culture. How do you manage create an event that offers something for everyone?

Dina: That’s a great question, Angela! And an issue that isn’t easy to juggle, as you can imagine. 

Dina and daughter with pony

One of the things we look for when we start looking for faculty are professionals who themselves cover a wide spectrum of the industry – that and being fun people who are passionate about what they do! By finding faculty who themselves juggle many types of children’s content, we are able to ask them to offer several different topics for their presentations, workshops and/or webinars. 

We also set up the Europolitan to have several presentations and workshops at any given moment so people can choose which one suits them best – which unfortunately often means people want to be in several places at once. I know I do… there are so many wonderful topics being covered that I myself don’t know which session to attend!

One of the tremendous opportunities we have at the Europolitan – and perhaps that which makes it the most unique – is the opportunity to discover both the U.K. and the U.S. markets all in one place. Even if both markets are in English, the culture difference is certainly there for both illustrations and manuscripts. The Europolitan is a wonderful opportunity for our members to learn about both markets and to see where their work might fit. 

I also think it’s fun for our faculty to share their experiences with their homologues (and sometimes work partners!) from across the pond. The Europolitan is small enough we can really share. It’s a unique opportunity for all of us to get together and discuss that which we all love – children’s books.

Elisabeth: You’ve hit on one of the biggest challenges we face! As we evaluate program content and presenters, we are always aware of the diversity of creators who will be attending the conference. 

Angela Cerrito

As Dina said, the key is finding presenters with a broad range of industry experience, and finding
topics that can apply to more than one demographic. I think the great thing about taking these things into consideration is that it pushes us to think creatively about our programming. 

A larger conference can have more presenters and program opportunities, enabling them to offer a more specialized approach to discussions of craft and the industry, whereas we need to take a broader approach.

I think this year’s theme is a perfect example: by talking about the partnerships within the industry, there will be content meaningful to members no matter where they are in their publishing journey: for someone not-yet agented, they may key in on the agent-creator relationship. 

For authors or illustrators who are agented, but not-yet published, the discussions about the editorial process might resonate with them. Those already published might gravitate towards discussions about marketing or discussions about craft. 
I think that regardless of what stage of their career attendees are at, they will come away with insights that will help them as they work toward the next stage.

Angela: SCBWI Europolitan is certainly all about relationships and offering support for creating content for children and teens. Thank you both for this insightful interview!

A few impressions from prior faculty:

Heather Alexander,
photo by Marcy Pusey

“The SCBWI Europolitan conference was a very special and totally unique experience. It was held in an art school in Paris, which was pretty marvelous, and the talent from around the world became people I’d never forget. It was fascinating to see how the different children’s book markets from around Europe influenced each writers’ style, and the mix of faculty from Europe and the U.S. helped bring those differences into focus. Not to mention chic Parisian dinners before and after–perfect for getting to know each other and the city.”


Heather Alexander
Editor and founder of Heather Alexander Editorial
faculty at Europolitan 2013 in Paris

I had such a remarkable time getting to know the writers who attended the Europolitan conference in 2015. Their experiences living outside of the United States lent themselves to fascinating stories that offered different points of view and a variety of traditions and customs. And getting to eat Stroopwaffels and visit the Van Gogh Museum was an added bonus…”


Jill Santopolo
Editorial Director of Philomel Books
faculty at Europolitan 2015 in Amsterdam

Marrietta Zacker,
photo by Doug Zacker

“Hearing the perspectives of writers and illustrators from other countries and those living abroad was so valuable. I would recommend the conference to anyone, regardless of where they are in their career. The conference was well-planned and well-run and the sessions were fun and informative for both the faculty and the attendees. We had the time and the space to learn about one another, and because we were looking at the industry with different lenses, our discussions were vibrant and enlightening.”

Marietta Zacker
Partner at Gallt and Zacker Literary Agency
faculty at Europolitan 2015 in Amsterdam

Born in the U.S., Dina von Lowenkraft has lived on 4 continents, worked as a graphic artist for television and as a consultant in the fashion industry. Somewhere between New York and Paris she picked up an MBA and a black belt. Dina is currently the Regional Advisor for SCBWI Belgium & Luxembourg, where she lives with her husband. She has two college-going daughters, two horses, a cat and multiple stacks of books to be read. Dina’s happy spot is a thousand kilometers north of the Arctic Circle.

Elisabeth Norton was first published at age 16 when she had no idea what an “unsolicited submission” was. Seeing her byline on the subsequently published magazine article ignited her desire for a career as an author.  Once she realized she wanted to write for children, she joined SCBWI and has served as Regional Advisor for Switzerland since early 2014. Originally from Alaska, she now lives in Switzerland between the Alps and the Jura with her family and two dogs, a 16-year-old Poodle and a 13-year-old Westie. When she’s writing, she can be found at her desk with a poodle lying on a pillow underneath it. When she’s not writing, you can find her spending time with her family hiking, biking, playing board games, and watching Star Trek.

Angela Cerrito is an author and a playwright. Her recent novel, The Safest Lie (Holiday House, 2015), was named a Best Children’s Book of the Year by The Guardian, a Notable Social Studies Book for Young People, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book and SCBWI’s Crystal Kite Award. She speaks about history, research, writing and early literacy to students, teachers and parents.

Cynsational Note:

Huge thanks to Elisabeth Norton for organizing and coordinating the Europolitian Conference Interview series for Cynsations! All week we have in-depth interviews with agents, editors and art directors sharing industry insights (even if you can’t make it to Belgium in May.)

Elisabeth Norton

2016 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Interview: Laura Stitzel

Laura with her cat, Milk

By Elisabeth Norton
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Laura Stitzel is an independent artist in Melbourne, Australia. She has been working as an illustrator, designer and animator in Australia and Canada since 2007.

Working mainly for children’s television, Laura was recently part of the creative team at one of North America’s largest animation studios in Toronto, Canada.

 There she worked on the Emmy Award™ winning “Peg + Cat,” and led the painting department on “Arthur,'” the world’s longest running children’s television series.

In her home of Melbourne, Australia, Laura has also illustrated and animated on a wide range of media including educational interactive projects, video games, advertisements, and television.

In her own illustrations, Laura’s work shines a light on animals and their place in our world. Creating artworks with a uniquely vintage style, Laura’s illustrations feature detailed pen and ink ornamentation and hand-lettering, paired with cheeky characters and cute creatures.

Congratulations on being awarded a SCBWI Bologna Illustrators’ Gallery Honorable Mention for your illustration “A Little Nonsense”!

Thank you, I’m just delighted!

You have a varied background as an illustrator – can you tell us about the different types of projects you’ve worked on?

My training is in animation. I’ve been working in the animation industry in both Melbourne and Toronto since 2007. I’m primarily a background artist, and I also animate and design characters and props. I’ve worked on children’s television programs as well as interactive projects and print media.

When I’m not working on these big projects I like to keep creating my own illustrations that have my own style.

What mediums do you work in? Does this vary depending on the type of project (print vs. website vs. television/animation)?

It does vary project to project. For my own illustrations, I always use pen and ink along with watercolour or digital painting. Sometimes there is no digital input at all, sometimes just for touch-ups.

When I’m working for an animation studio, the process is almost entirely digital. I’m an avid Photoshop enthusiast. I love figuring out ways to imitate real painting and drawing techniques in Photoshop. This was a big part of my role on the children’s show Arthur, during its transition from cell animation to digital. I developed a new process for the painting team and created digital brushes to best recreate the original look of the beloved show. It was a great experience.

Of course there are exceptions, I was lucky enough to create some artwork for “Peg + Cat,” which is made using gouache and pencil and then scanned in for animation. Sitting in a modern animation studio and painting was quite surreal – and a real delight.

Do you have a favorite medium or illustration tool?

Absolutely – fine liners. I love using ink and I get the best results using a handful of fine liners with variations in thickness. I use black, brown and sepia. I just love that I can do both fine details and bold outlines.

I’m a big fan of old fashioned rendering techniques like stippling and cross hatching. I also use a nib pen sometimes, but it’s a lot less predictable – which is sometimes a good thing.

When I’m doing my roughs in pencil, my other cant-live-without tool is an eraser stick. With a ‘sharpened’ eraser, I can erase in a very fine line, which I use to carve gaps in or clean up my messy pencil line work. So it’s like I have two drawing tools – a pencil for grey and an eraser for white – genius!

Can you tell us about your typical creative process?

Sure. Once I have an idea for an illustration that I’m happy with, I draw a quick rough sketch to work out the story, the poses and the composition. Then I dive into references. I have loads of books of vintage advertisements and posters from the early 1900s, and I can’t do without them. I’ll use them to get ideas for a border, or a rendering technique, a font, a little ornamental decoration or even a character’s clothing.

If I’m doing hand lettering I’ll often go online to find the perfect font, and I also use Google Images for references for animals. How anybody ever drew without Google Images, I’ll never know. Then I rough out my line work in pencil. I use tracing paper a lot to mirror decorative elements or shift parts around. Then, when I’m ready – I go over all my line work in pen, and do some passes of watercolour. I often draw in layers, then scan them in and assemble them in Photoshop.

Lastly, I digitally apply any finishing touches. I’ll usually leave it and come back to it the next day with fresh eyes and find a few little things I want to change.

Does it vary depending on what kind of project you are working on?

Of course when I’m working for an animation studio, the creative process is dictated by the established style of the show, and by tight deadlines! That means there is less individual freedom, but I’m creating part of a larger vision which is immensely satisfying.

However, there are parts of my own creative process that I bring to a studio environment. I’m always a believer in taking time to rough out a plan and to look at references before diving in.

Taking a step back and reassessing an image’s readability is also very important.

Of course with studio work I can’t always leave something overnight, but I have little tricks – such as always having the Navigator in Photoshop visible, so I can keep seeing my image at a glance and making sure it works.

We’d love to hear more about your winning illustration “A Little Nonsense.” Was it part of a larger project, or is it a stand-alone piece?

This piece is a stand-alone work – but it is one of a few illustrations I’ve created using quotes from the 1971 film “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.” Mr. Wonka’s dialogue is smattered with literary references, and I’ve used a handful of them over the years. So I guess I have borrowed quotes from a character who borrows quotes from everyone else!

I intended for the characters in the illustration to be familiar from old stories and nursery rhymes, but not specific to one film or book. For example there is a little piggie eating roast beef, there’s an owl and a pussycat, and there’s a fox in a bandit mask. They’re all on some kind of adventure together that we don’t really know about, but we might imagine it.

By pairing these characters with the quote – ‘A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men’ – I’m saying that imagined characters and stories mean something to all of us, they have a place in our world and they’re important.

What was the medium and the creative process for this illustration?

I illustrated the characters, the border and the lettering using my beloved fine liners, and painted the colour in Photoshop. The colour palette I borrowed from a 1917 advertisement for McCallum Silk Hosiery.

I love colour theory and finding out why some colours work together and others don’t, and I wanted to see if I could appropriate an established colour palette. I don’t usually reference something quite so directly – I also borrowed the sun and fish! – but it was an experiment and I’m happy with how it turned out.

What is a typical creative session like for you?

Just so much fun. I give myself a few dedicated hours to cut off from the world. I always put on loud music and sing terribly.

I find the pencil stage makes me a bit anxious – what if I can’t get on the page what I can see in my head? But the inking stage is pure bliss – I’m in my own world, what they call ‘flow’. I usually draw way longer into the night than I ever intended and regret it the next day.

Do you have a dedicated place that you like to create?

No, actually I don’t! I like to move around a lot, and it’s very important to me that I can create no matter where I am and no matter my surroundings. I have a fairly portable drawing board and a laptop.

In the past few years, I have traveled a lot and get my best ideas when I’m out discovering the world, so it’s important to me that I can draw and create in a variety of spaces.

Some of my favourite illustrations I’ve done in a sketchbook propped on my lap on a bumpy train ride, waiting in an airport, lying in a park, or wearing earbuds in one of the world’s many coffee shops.

Thank you so much for spending time with us today! I look forward to seeing more of your illustrations in the future.

Thanks for having me!

Cynsational Notes

Find Laura on Facebook at facebook.com/lauradrawsart.

Elisabeth Norton grew up
in Alaska, lived for many years and Texas, and after a brief sojourn in
England, now lives with her family between the Alps and the Jura in
Switzerland.

She writes for middle grade readers and serves as the regional advisor for the Swiss chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

When not writing, she can be found walking the dogs, playing board
games, and spending time with family and friends. Find her on Twitter @fictionforge.

The Bologna 2016 Interview series is coordinated by Angela Cerrito, SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and a Cynsational Reporter in Europe and beyond.

2016 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Interview: Lisa Anchin

By Angela Cerrito
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Lisa Anchin has been drawing since she could hold a pencil and making up stories since she could speak. 

She grew up just outside of New York City, passing briefly through Massachusetts where she picked up a B.A. from Smith College, and then she returned to New York to work and to later pursue additional graduate degrees—an MA at Columbia and an MFA at the School of Visual Arts. 

Lisa now freelances full time as an illustrator and designer. She is the illustrator of A Penguin Named Patience by Suzanne Lewis (Sleeping Bear, 2015). Her second illustrated book, I Will Love You, by Alyssa Satin Capucilli will be released in spring 2017 (Scholastic). 

When not in her studio, she can be found haunting one of the many cafes of the five boroughs, sitting with a bucket of tea and scribbling in her sketchbook. She lives in Brooklyn with her partner in crime and a not-so-little black cat.

Congratulations on your work “Happy Birthday Fox,” being selected as a finalist for SCBWI’s Bologna Illustrators’ Gallery. It’s on display at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. What was the inspiration behind Happy Birthday Fox?

I’ve been trying to expand my palette, so as an exercise, I’ve started picking colors that I don’t generally use then planning an illustration based on those colors.

“Happy Birthday Fox” was one of these painting exercises.

The mustard, aqua, orange, bright magenta, and lime green felt like party colors.

But rather than the moment of the party itself, I wanted to illustrate that contented, happy sigh moment that comes after the party has ended.

You are the illustrator of A Penguin Named Patience (Sleeping Bear, 2015). What was it like illustrating your first children’s book? Were there any unexpected developments?

A Penguin Named Patience was my first illustrated book and an interesting challenge.

Serendipitously, I actually received the offer only a few days before I left for a trip to New Orleans for an illustrator’s weekend. While I was there, my fellow illustrators generously agreed to accompany me on a visit the Audubon Aquarium, so I could take reference photos.

I was able to photograph the penguin enclosure and the South African penguins featured in in the book. That was a really luck coincidence, and then the publisher also sent additional images of Tom, the penguins’ keeper, and videos of the penguins’ triumphant return to New Orleans.

I had never made such a large body of work on a single subject before. That in and of itself was an experience. Before I began work on the final pieces, I did quite a few character studies and color tests. I wanted to make sure that everything would be consistent throughout the book.

Overall it was a really wonderful experience. Not to mention, drawing penguins is a pretty great way to spend your workday.

Tell us about your school visits? I imagine students are excited to learn about Patience and the other penguins who were rescued after hurricane Katrina.

My school visits have been really rewarding. The first one I did was actually at my old elementary school. The kids I’ve spoken with are always excited that the book is based on a true story, and that Patience was a real penguin living at the aquarium at the time of the storm.

After reading the story together and answering their questions about the reality of what happened and the making of the book, I like to draw with the kids. I usually start by talking about South African penguins before taking them through the basic steps to draw Patience.

With older kids, I can also talk about storytelling, character development, and how to visually emphasize your protagonist, especially when all of your characters are a single type of animal and all look very similar. I love watching the kids draw and seeing the characters they imagine and create.

What is a typical work day like for you?

On studio days—I also freelance at a publisher doing book design during the week—I’m usually at my desk by nine. I set aside some time in the morning to take care of business related things—emails, invoices, etc.—and then I begin with warm-up sketches.

Sometimes these are drawings of the characters for the project I’m currently working on, but usually I use it as free drawing time. Often these open, sketch-anything moments lead to nuggets of ideas for future stories.

After my warm-ups, I dive into work, which ranges from writing, thumbnailing images for a new dummy, sketching, working on color studies, or painting a final piece.

The actual work of the day depends on where I am in a project. I try to take small breaks as I work—for a new cup of tea, to play with my cat, or just to stand up and stretch—and I always take a long walk in the middle of the day, which inevitably includes a stop at the library three blocks from my apartment on my way home.

What are you working on now?

As of this week, I just finished the art for a new book called I Will Love You, written by Alyssa Satin Capucilli and being published by Scholastic in the spring of 2017. It’s a lovely story, told from a parent/care-giver to a child. The text uses beautiful, lyrical language, and is a non-linear narrative, which allowed me to stretch my imagination. It was a joy to illustrate.

I’m also working on a number of my own stories, and I often have a few in progress.

If I get stuck on one project, I can put it aside and work on another until I’m ready to return to the first.

Right now I’m juggling work on an entirely new manuscript with revisions on two book dummies—one is a story about a precocious little plant and her garden and the second features a character that I’ve been calling Little Viking.

Do you have advice for artists who are just getting started in the field of children’s illustration?

Childhood Painter

First and foremost, join SCBWI. Between the conferences, the technical and professional information, and the community, the organization provides an unparalleled wealth of resources for someone new to the field. I owe much of my career to SCBWI, and I specifically want to emphasize the importance of the community generated by SCBWI.

As illustrators and writers, our work is largely solitary, and it’s so important to find a group of like-minded folks. They can both provide moral support on those hard-to-work-through days of doubt, and also honest feedback on your work.

If you don’t yet have an agent, editor, or art director to turn to for creative feedback, it’s helpful to have critiques from peers. I still look to my illustration critique group for a first round of editing and feedback well before I pitch a new story or dummy to my agent.

Cynsational Notes

Angela Cerrito is a pediatric physical therapist by day and a writer by night. She thinks she has the two best jobs in the world.

Her latest novel, The Safest Lie (Holiday House), was named a finalist for the 2015 Jewish Book Award, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Readers and a Notable Social Studies Book for Young People.

Angela coordinates the SCBWI Bologna Interview series, volunteers as SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and is a Cynsational reporter in Europe and beyond.

2016 SCBWI Bologna Author-Illustrator Interview: Elizabeth O. Dulemba

By Elisabeth Norton
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Elizabeth O. Dulemba is an award-winning children’s author-illustrator with more than two dozen titles to her credit, including her debut historical fiction, A Bird on Water Street (Little Pickle, 2014), which has been awarded thirteen prestigious literary honors, including Georgia Author of the Year and a Green Earth Book Award Honor.


Elizabeth splits her time between Roanoke, Virginia, where she teaches Picture Book Design as visiting associate professor at Hollins University in the MFA in Children’s Book Writing and Illustrating program, and Scotland, where she is currently pursuing an MFA in Illustration at the University of Edinburgh.


Elizabeth maintains and active blog where she hosts author/illustrator guest posts each week and gives away free coloring pages. Her weekly newsletter has more than 3,600 subscribers.

Elizabeth, welcome to Cynsations! Thank you so much for taking time to talk with me today.

Thanks so much for having me!

Can you tell us a bit more about your background? How long have you been an illustrator? What led you to pursuing a career in children’s books, and specifically in illustration?

Hoo boy. I’ve wanted to illustrate picture books since I was a little kid. I used to stare at Garth Williams’ illustrations in The Golden Book of Elves and Fairies (1951) and wish I could create that same magic with my art.

As a kid, I always had a drawing pad and pencil with me. Of course, back then, I didn’t know real people actually made books. And even though the adults in my life knew I was an artist and supported me with lessons my entire life, they steered me towards a more stable lifestyle.

I became a graphic designer for many years. I was always in-house illustrator, though, and I never stopped dreaming about creating books.

When I married my husband, I got the chance. We moved to be together, and I went freelance while I pursued my dream to illustrate books. Three years in, I got my first contract to illustrate The Prince’s Diary (Lee & Low, 2005).

You have illustrated both your own stories, and those of others. Is there a creative difference for you as an illustrator when you are illustrating your own work, versus illustrating someone else’s work?

It took me seven years to get my first contract as both author and illustrator, Soap, Soap, Soap (Raven Tree, 2009). Until that time, I had a lot of fun coming up with images for other people’s writing – I still do. But yeah, it’s a blast to come up with my own text and images.

Heck, I imagine it will be fun to have another illustrator use my words at some point. It’s all about telling stories and creating! I love all of it!

What mediums do you work in?

I’m currently pursuing an MFA in Illustration at the University of Edinburgh College of Art. It’s an introspective and experimental time for me. I feel like I’m in the thick of a creative chrysalis at the moment.

So while I was digital for my first 15 years, I’ve been working with more traditional media of late, getting messy with paint up to my elbows.

We’ll see what style steps forward as my fave. I don’t know yet!

Does this vary depending on the type of project?

Yes! I tend to follow the vision of the story rather than stick to one particular personal style (so far). Although, I’ve been told that when you look at my works on the whole, they all look like mine. Ha!

Do you have a favorite medium or illustration tool?

Elizabeth’s studio

Not at the moment! I’ve been leaning towards dip pen and ink with watercolors. But I just discovered dyes, and I don’t want to throw out the computer altogether, so we’ll see!

Can you tell us about your typical creative process?

I’m right in the thick of a new project, so I can share exactly!

Right now, I’m in the research stage. I’m looking at images, costumes, architecture, landscapes, color palettes, trying to soak in the looks of the story I’ll be working on – get it set in my head. I broke out the text into the key moments I think I’ll need to illustrate. And I’ve done some very rough thumbnails to get an idea of how the story will visually break out.

Next, I’ll start doing sketches – tons and tons and tons of sketches! Slowly, I’ll start working out my compositions and get bigger and tighter with those. Then I’ll start playing with whatever media I choose. I love the rendering stage the best, so I can’t wait to get to that!

Does it vary depending on what kind of project you are working on?

Y’know, not really. I was sitting here doing online research, and for a minute I thought, “I’m not drawing, why am I wasting time?” And then I realized that I always do it this way and I’m not wasting time at all!

What is a typical creative session like for you?

There’s no such thing as a typical creative session! It’s always different.

Even though my processes remain similar, I might be researching, sketching, painting, digitally rendering – all while listening to music, an audiobook, or requiring absolute quiet so that I can concentrate. It all depends on what stage I’m in.

Do you have a dedicated place that you like to create? Has that changed for you over the years?

Right now, my dedicated space is my desk at the university. It’s a big change from my dedicated studio/office bedroom in the states! But I love the energy of being surrounded by creative students.

I also love that I have to walk through beautiful Edinburgh every day to get here (1.6 miles from my flat). My view is of 17th and 18th century buildings, and lunch often involves meandering into one of the loveliest and oldest areas of the city (Grassmarket). Yeah – it rocks.

You are also the author of a middle grade novel, A Bird on Water Street (Little Pickle, 2014). What was that creative process like for you, in contrast to the very visual medium of picture books?

Completely different. I didn’t realize I was writing a novel when I started it, but dozens of interviews, rewrites, and ten years on, I’m a novelist!

A Bird on Water Street has gotten fantastic reviews and even won 13 literary awards and honors! I’m so proud of the novel, it’s done some wonderfully positive things for the community in which it took place, and for me personally. It has its own web page at http://ABirdOnWaterStreet.com.

As far as the creative process when writing – it has to be dead quiet outside my head because it is so loud inside my head! Now that the writing muse has been set loose, there’s no stopping her.

Sadly, she doesn’t get along very well with my illustration muse. They are constantly battling for my time.

Do you have plans for more middle grade works?

I do! I have about three or four other novels that are at various stages. It’s hard to concentrate on novels right now, though. School is keeping me unbelievably busy, and I don’t get unified chunks of mental space where I can focus on one project.

Instead, I’m working on dozens of projects all the time right now (including personal projects – mostly picture books – and school projects). But spring break is coming, then two months of summer before I head to Hollins University where I teach in the MFA in Children’s Book Writing and Illustrating program, then over a month free before school starts back.

I’m planning to do some concentrated creating in those windows!

I loved your recent TED talk. Like you, my husband and I sold our house and most of our possessions to make a move from the U.S. to Europe. For those who haven’t seen your TED talk yet, can you tell us what led you to make that move?

Thanks! I’ve received the nicest emails from folks who feel the same way or have experienced something similar. It’s been a tangent from my children’s books and school studies, but equally as gratifying. I think a lot of folks are experience-based people trapped in stuff-based lifestyles and could do what I did… I sold almost everything I own to move overseas and go back to school.

Truly, the best way to understand my journey is to actually watch my TED talk.

While it’s not specifically about children’s books, it describes the motivation behind how I live my life, which is all about children’s books!

So you’re currently studying children’s illustration in the masters of fine arts program at Edinburgh University in Edinburgh, Scotland. Can you tell us more about your plans once you complete that program?

I’m going to pursue a PhD in Picture Books! Several reasons have come together in my life to make an advanced degree make sense for me. And who knows, I might actually become an expert!

Through it all, I’ll continue to teach at Hollins University in the summers (it’s a summer MFA program).

After that, I really don’t know. That’s one of the nice things about being mobile. I don’t feel trapped by anything anymore. The future is exciting and shiny!

What is the one piece of advice you would give an aspiring illustrator or author?

Follow your heart, not the trends. The only thing you can control is yourself. Heck, you can’t even always control your own creativity.

Be willing to jump down rabbit holes and see where creativity leads you. More often than not, your instincts will take you someplace good – especially if you get your pesky brain out of the way.

Thank you so much for spending time with us today! It’s been an absolute pleasure to talk to you.

Thank you! I’m honored!

Cynsational Notes

Elisabeth Norton grew up in Alaska, lived for many years and Texas, and after a brief sojourn in England, now lives with her family between the Alps and the Jura in Switzerland.

She writes for middle grade readers and serves as the regional advisor for the Swiss chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

When not writing, she can be found walking the dogs, playing board
games, and spending time with family and friends. Find her on Twitter @fictionforge.

The Bologna 2016 Interview series is coordinated by Angela Cerrito, SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and a Cynsational Reporter in Europe and beyond.

2016 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Interview: Rahele Jomepour

By Angela Cerrito
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

Rahele Jomepour was born in Mashhad, Iran. She moved to the United States in 2011 and graduated with MFA in Visual Arts from Iowa State University in 2015. 

She is a professional children’s picture book illustrator and painter, living and working in a tiny city of Ames in the state of Iowa. 

Rahele has illustrated seven children’s books, including Donkey in the Woods, The Great hunting, The Lion and the Rabbit, The Grape Garden. Follow her Instagram/blog.

I really enjoyed the detailed coffee cup illustrations on your website. What inspired this set of illustrations?

I started to draw on paper coffee cups right after I came back from the SCBWI conference in Los Angeles, summer 2013. I was overwhelmed with a lot of fabulous information I had received from the workshops and people who share the same love of picture books.

I actually went to the university’s coffee shop and ordered my regular coffee. While I was reviewing my notes from the conference, I started to just draw on my paper coffee cup as a mental break.

Suddenly I found the surface of the coffee cup very smooth and very friendly to work with in pencil. I looked around and imagined myself and other people as different type of animal characters – rabbits, dogs, cats, etc. Later, I started to think how cool it would be if I kept all of my coffee cups every day and instead of drawing in my flat sketchbook, use my coffee cups as my daily round sketchbook.

This unique dimension altered my understanding of composition, forgoing page borders in exchange for unending movement. I found this idea to be vital in illustrating a story – propel the viewer toward a world without borders and limitations imposed by the edge of a page.

All drawings include every simple joy we have in our routine life and sometimes we forget about them. The illustrations help my audience to take a look back into their inner child and invite it to come up and play the life and enjoy the freedom of uninhibited self-expression. This open-ended approach to storytelling helped me find a new style in illustration.

You categorize your children’s art in your website into two categories “fine & detailed” as well as “loose & simple.” Is this a decision you make before starting on a piece? Or is it something you decide after completion?

Mostly this is an afterthought. Some works are highly detailed images of simple ideas, other times they are sketches containing a great deal of meaning. These categories describe how I’m feeling at the time.

Some works I really focus on, and curate every detail. Other works I’m just not so patient with, and need to just get the basic point across and move on.

But the major differentiation is not always in terms of graphic detail. Sometimes I spend extra time on subtleties that illustrate complexities of life, whereas other times I just want to make something that is easy for people to relate to.

There are times in our lives when we look at every little detail, and focus on it intently, and other times in our lives where we just want to ‘take it easy’. I only make the distinction on my web site to aid the viewer, not necessarily to define my work.

What was the inspiration behind “Donkey in the Forest,” your piece that was a finalist for the SCBWI Bologna Illustrators’ Gallery?

“Donkey in the Forest” was part of a series of images associated with a series of books I recently completed with a publisher in Iran. These books were part of a national curriculum that millions of young people took part in, as part of national testing.

I was honored to be included in this project, as it drew on stories and themes that have been part of Iranian culture for hundreds, even thousands of years. Stories are the conduit of human understanding through the ages. It is through metaphor that we grow and maintain a sense of who we are, our place in this world, and our duty to grow.

The donkey represents so many aspects of humanity. His reflection is our reflection, and through his life experience we evaluate our own. Have we grown? Have we been content with our own understanding of the world? Is it a fact that everything we believe is true?

Letting go, and connecting with the small animal that is ourselves is a step toward understanding these broader issues. The donkey is simply a trusted friend with whom we can travel, each on our own unique journey.

How has your art changed over the years?

Art for me over the years has changed with my life, as anyone else. As a teenager in Mashhad, Iran, I was interested in testing limits as any normal teenager would. I felt lost and alone, burying myself in books and culture well past the limits of my own neighborhood and city in an attempt to know that which is not widely known, or see that which is not readily available in a confusing and contradictory world. In my twenties, I was concerned with independence and growing past my preconceptions of those expectations upon me. There were a number of pieces of art that I produced that I was excited to publicize, but I knew better as it may have proven difficult for my family or detrimental to my career.

I grew past this impulsive and sometimes mischievous phase into my thirties as a master’s student at the University of Tehran. Unfortunately, I had not yet understood the boundaries and cultural limitations that my work tested, and I left before I was finished with my MFA.

Since coming the U.S., I have tempered my message, working to understand the deeper meanings of my roots, while also refining and broadening my messages to appeal to a wider variety of audiences, enabling people to think and question the world around them without fear of persecution.

The donkey relates to us that we are all put on this Earth to live, and breathe, and feel and love, right or wrong, and that it’s ok to relate to an image that may reflect our emotions at the time. The donkey also carries with him the test of human character over time, that all of our cultures have come from somewhere, and are worthy of patience and understanding.

What are you working on now?

I have several projects at the moment. Project Art at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is part of the “Percent for Art”–an effort promoting education and cultural understanding within public spaces.

Two projects focus on public spaces and our relation to them. The BenchMarks project in Iowa City takes a simple public object, a bench, and creates a metaphor for public engagement, encouraging passers-by to relax and enjoy a peaceful moment that their community has provided.

The second project is through City Sounds, The Des Moines Public Piano Project. This project takes used pianos, subjects them to visual artistic interpretation, and places them throughout the greater Des Moines area in attempt to draw out and engage the public in well-mannered frivolity under the sun, with music and sound at their fingertips.

I have also begun collaboration with a New York agency working on a new and evolving project focusing on education-oriented work for school-age children.


What advice would you offer someone just starting out in the field of children’s book illustration?

The common adage in writing is “Write what you know.” Illustration is no different, in that one should illustrate what they see, both through their eyes and through their mind.

Likewise, this is not as easy as it sounds, so don’t be afraid to see things differently. Not every dimension is well-defined, and not every answer is questioned.

Cynsational Notes

Angela Cerrito is a pediatric physical therapist by day and a writer by night. She thinks she has the two best jobs in the world.

Her latest novel, The Safest Lie
(Holiday House), was named a finalist for the 2015 Jewish Book Award, a
Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Readers and a Notable Social
Studies Book for Young People.

Angela Coordinates the SCBWI Bologna Interview series, volunteers as SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and is a Cynsational reporter in Europe and beyond.

2016 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Interview: Dorothia Rohner

By Angela Cerrito
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

From an early age, Dorothia Rohner knew she was an artist. Inheriting her artistic parent’s fascination with art and nature, she was encouraged to pursue and refine her skills. She studied technical illustration, fine art, art history and graphic design. 

Eventually, she earned her degree in Biological Pre-medical Illustration from Iowa State University—a curriculum that allowed her to combine her love of illustration and science. 

As an artist, she has worked in various fields: scientific illustration, animation, graphic design, nature painting, licensing and gift design. She now works from her studio, surrounded by woods, overlooking a small pond where she writes and illustrates stories for children; inspired by nature, imagination and a tad bit of humor. She also enjoys creating pop-up and moveable books.


Her illustrated children’s books include: Numbers in a Row, An Iowa Number Book (Sleeping Bear Press) and Effie’s Image (Prairieland Press). 

Her work for children has also been published in Cricket Magazine

Her illustration, Firefly Forest, was the Grand Prize Winner at 2014 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Gallery, Bologna Children’s Book Fair

That same year, she was selected for the 2014 SCBWI Portfolio Mentorship Award at the SCBWI Summer Conference. 

Her portfolio was one of six chosen out of two-hundred. Follow Dorthia: Instagram & Twitter: @dorothiar and Facebook.

What inspired you to begin creating illustrations for children?

When I was small, my mother wrote stories for my six siblings and me. She created believable worlds and illustrations to go with them. They were never published, but I remember how magical an ordinary day became when she shared her stories with us—inviting us into her imaginative worlds.

My mother’s influence first inspired me to want to create books for children. Years later, while studying scientific illustration, the class assignment was to make a spread for a children’s book. That studio project sparked my childhood memories and rekindled that desire to make books for kids. It took a little while, but eventually I illustrated my first children’s book.

How has your experience with scientific illustration influenced your work for children?

Good question! The transition from creating scientific to children’s illustration has been interesting journey for me. Because of my scientific training, I wanted to add every detail into an illustration. For children’s illustrations, I’ve had to un-learn some of that training in order to leave emotional room for the viewer, exaggerated expressions, emotion and motion. I’m still working on that.

My training has influenced me to enjoy drawing animals, plants, birds and insects living in the natural world. However, with my illustrations for kids, I find it much more fun to add in a few fairies, and other whimsical critters.

What was the inspiration for the illustration Firefly Forest, winner of the 2014 SCBWI Bologna Illustrators’ Gallery?

I’ve always been fascinated with fireflies because of the magic they bring to summer nights. Years ago, like most children, we used to chase and capture them to fill our jars with light.

Inspired by these memories and the forest we now live near, I sketched out the trees that speak only truth, an angry council of fireflies that rule the forest and a little girl carrying a jar full of fireflies, searching for her brother. I intentionally left the narrative open for the viewer to interpret.

I created this illustration in two days and I really enjoyed working on it. However, I almost didn’t enter the BIG contest because I thought it was too odd of an illustration. However, I ended up sending it anyway. I’m glad I did.

What are you working on right now?

With the input of my agent, Laura Biagi, I am revising a manuscript that is almost ready for submission. Yay! I’m finishing up the character sketches and illustrations that will accompany this story.

While I was in New York at the winter SCBWI conference, I was able to meet with Laura to discuss my other projects. She asked about the story behind Firefly Forest, so I am brainstorming and diving into that next. I also received helpful input from an art director in New York on a novelty fairy book, so I will be revising that too. I also have a sketchbook filled with ideas that could be potential stories.

Dorothia & Laura

What advice would you offer illustrators who are just starting out in the field of children’s literature?

The advice I try to remember is patience, practice and perseverance. It’s hasn’t been that long since I began focusing on making books for children, so I still feel new to this, too.

In any field of creating art, I believe it is essential to honor your individuality and create from the inner voice. This helps to quiet the inner critic that so often leads to comparison and competition with other artists. It is important to study other artists work, get involved with online picture book communities, and celebrate other’s successes.

I would suggest joining SCBWI, going to conferences, getting portfolio and manuscript critiques, joining local critique groups and finding like minded people who you can learn from, share with and enjoy the journey. Lastly, read lots and lots of kids books!

Cynsational Notes

Angela Cerrito is a pediatric physical therapist by day and a writer by night. She thinks she has the two best jobs in the world.

Her latest novel, The Safest Lie
(Holiday House), was named a finalist for the 2015 Jewish Book Award, a
Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Readers and a Notable Social
Studies Book for Young People.

Angela Coordinates the SCBWI Bologna Interview series, volunteers as SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and is a Cynsational reporter in Europe and beyond.

2016 SCBWI Bologna Illustrator Interview: Annie Won

By Angela Cerrito
for SCBWI Bologna 2016
and Cynthia Leitich Smith‘s Cynsations

New-York based illustrator Annie Won received her MFA at the School of Visual Arts in New York. 

Her style is characterized by the use of digital collage, mixed perspective, and a dreamlike quality that speaks to the imagination of children. 

Her illustrations will appear in The Dragon Circus, Tea Party, Picnic in the Snow, and Welcoming Song, ibooks such as The Old Man and The Sea, The Hound of the Baskerville and picture books that will appear in 2017.

Congratulations on your illustration The Light being selected as a finalist for SCBWI’s Bologna Illustration Gallery. SCBWI will display The Light at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair. Can you tell us about the inspiration for this illustration?

Thank you to SCBWI for selecting my piece. I am so pleased to have such a great opportunity. I hope I can attend the Bologna Children’s Book Fair one day.

I can’t say what inspired me exactly. It may have been a sweet lyric of a song, a warm breeze across my face or a touching story from news. What I know is all of those were mixed harmonically and made me to create image of mother and her child.

As a children’s book author-illustrator, my illustration is always based on stories. It’s funny that I need a full story even though I draw a simple doodle. And The Light is the peak moment of a story about a Mother who finds her lost child.

I can see that emotion in the illustration. When did you begin drawing?

I started drawing when I was able to grab something to draw with. My official artistic career started with my first job. I was a computer game concept artist. I drew all kinds of things such as characters, trees, clothes, weapons and more for the game.

However, after working as a designer about seven years, I decided to do something more meaningful for both people and myself: a children’s book author-illustrator. I studied at School of Visual Art and after graduating the awesome course, now I am working as a freelance illustrator.

What led you to children’s book illustration?

I love children’s picture books. They are each like a small art gallery with brilliant stories. Also I’m always amazed by how children read stories from a single image. They even find something interesting in my image that I haven’t recognized!

You’ve illustrated work for children’s magazines, including the cover for the back to school issue of Spider (September 2015). What do you enjoy most about magazine illustration?

I like magazine work because I can try something new for each piece and have to complete those as fine images. I must get successful results right away, since I don’t have much time to start everything again. Compare to children’s book assignment, magazine assignments have to be completed on a tighter deadline. Thus it is pretty tough but I love the challenge. And I love my editor Sue, who encourages me to try the new thing.

What advice do you have for others who are starting a career as a children’s book illustrator?

Do not to give up your dream. It seemed like I would never get a book assignment until I was offered my first assignment by Little Golden Books.

Before that, I tried my best to promote my work and learn from others. I made more than dozens of picture book dummies, sent bunch of postcards to publishers, presented my portfolio to several publishers, joined SCBWI and attended three conferences, enrolled children’s book boot camps and more. While I was trying those things, nothing was sure and clear except one thing: I believed that my dream would come true if I don’t stop trying.

What are you working on now?

I just completed my first Golden Books illustration assignment. And now, I am working on another magazine piece, cover art for Ladybug magazine. I am also developing my own story for a picture book, too. I am truly happy to start my career as children’s picture book illustrator but I hope I can publish my own story as well.

Cynsational Notes

Angela Cerrito is a pediatric physical therapist by day and a writer by night. She thinks she has the two best jobs in the world.

Her latest novel, The Safest Lie
(Holiday House), was named a finalist for the 2015 Jewish Book Award, a
Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Older Readers and a Notable Social
Studies Book for Young People.

Angela Coordinates the SCBWI Bologna Interview series, volunteers as SCBWI’s Assistant International Advisor and is a Cynsational reporter in Europe and beyond.